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A candidate interviewing with your company doesn’t mean they’ve decided to take the opportunity if offered. Here are some valuable strategies to engage a candidate, attract sales talent, and sell them on your opportunity.

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Just because someone decided to interview with you doesn’t necessarily mean they’ve decided that they want to work for your organization—at least not yet.

Here is how to attract sales talent:

Interviews exist not just to help you decide if you want to hire them, it’s also to help them decide whether they want to take their time, labor, and skill set to your organization. When you interview someone, remember that they’re making a judgment just as much as you are. So how can you engage a candidate to the point where they want to join your company? Today we’ll discuss how to sell a candidate on coming to work for you and your organization.

The first major point to address is a shift in your thinking. I understand that you want to make the right hire, but you also don’t want to find a candidate only to discover that they don’t want to work for you because you didn’t sell them. To avoid this, you really have to be engaging.

There has to be a balance between asking qualifying questions to determine what’s in it for you as the qualifying company and what’s in it for them as a candidate. You have to ask a candidate the right questions and find out what their hot buttons are. Here are some examples:

  • What interests them about potentially working for your company?
  • What part of the work do they enjoy doing the most?
  • What kind of corporate culture would they excel the most in?
  • How do they prefer to be managed?
  • What do they like about the job they’re applying for, as they understand it?
  • Who else has an impact on their career decision?
  • What do they do for fun?

There are plenty of other questions to ask; you want to take the focus of off what you’re looking for so you can focus on what the candidate is looking for. The best way to do that is to genuinely care.

The problem, however, is that most interviews are one-sided. Don’t forget that it’s a two-way street.

 

Try to look at things from the candidate’s perspective.

 

The next big idea is to put yourself in their shoes and ask yourself why you would be interested in the role if you were them. Think in regard to your optimal candidate—what’s in it for them?  What would attract sales talent? Filling in these blanks will help you figure it out: I’m a good boss because…

  • They’ll have all the tools to be successful because…
  • The rest of the team is great to work with because…
  • The problems they can help the company solve is…
  • This is a really important role to company success because…
  • You’ll be able to make a big impact by…
  • The amount of people who have been promoted within the company is…
  • The job is interesting because…
  • The majority of the time in this role will be spent…
  • People enjoy working for the company because…
  • The coaching and training we provide will help them with their professional career development because…
  • It’s not just a job, it’s a career, because…
  • The company is willing to invest in them and their career specifically by…
  • They will be rewarded for their success with…
  • The company is growing because…
  • This is good for them because…
  • The company has a good reputation in our industry because…
  • The industry is growing because…

These are all ways to engage and sell a candidate on what’s in it for them and why they should join your organization. The key is to think of it from the perspective of the candidate because when you describe the role, you really want it to resonate with that individual.

I’d like to hear your thoughts on this topic. What has your company done to make things more engaging for candidates and attract sales talent? Similarly, I’d love for you to reach out to me with any questions you have.

I look forward to hearing from you!